Monthly Recaps Reviews

June in Review

February 8, 2021

June in Review

Check, Please! Book 1: #Hockey by Ngozi Ukazu — 5 stars
Check, Please! Book 2: Sticks and Scones by Ngozi Ukazu — 5 stars
Technically, You Started It by Lana Wood Johnson — 4.5 stars

If you’re in need of a warm hug, then the Check, Please! graphic novels are for you. This series is the absolute cutest—there’s baking, an adorable romance, found family, and hockey. The art is so wonderful, and Bitty is such a delightful, kind character. Book 1 focuses on Bitty’s freshman and sophomore years and Book 2 his junior and senior years—I loved this layout and how his transformation can be really seen as Bitty grows up and faces new challenges, navigates college life, and discovers himself. Plus, Jack and Bitty are one of my favorite ships in a long time! If you’re looking for a fun college YA that really captures the college experience, this graphic novel series is a must-read! Check out my aesthetic for the series!

I flew through Technically, You Started! Told completely through text messages, this book is such a quick read and the back-and-forth banter between Haley and Martin is so fun! This contemporary romance is charming, hilarious, and quirky—a combo not to be missed.

Memoirs

I’m Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness by Austin Channing Brown — 5 stars
Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates — 4.5 stars

I don’t read memoirs often, but I listened to the audiobook for I’m Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness and it was incredible. Hearing the author narrate the book made her story even more personal and powerful! I did not want to stop listening to it and finished in a day. This is an important read, and I’ve been recommending it to so many people in my personal life.

I slowly listened to the Between the World and Me audiobook, taking it all in as I went on walks around my neighborhood. If you’re unfamiliar with this book, Between the World and Me is written as a letter from a father to his son on his experience being a Black man in America. It’s a raw, eye-opening read and very relevant addition to your TBRs.

Have you read any of these books yet? What books did you read in June?

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